French and Francophone Studies (Bi-Co)

Department Website:
https://www.haverford.edu/french

The Bi-College (Bi-Co) French and Francophone Studies program at Haverford and Bryn Mawr is recognized as one of the top undergraduate French programs in the country. The major in French lays the foundation for an understanding and appreciation of French language and of French and Francophone cultures through their literatures and the history of their arts, thought, and institutions.

Course offerings serve those with interest in French and Francophone literature, literary theory, and criticism, as well as those with interest in studying France and French-speaking countries from an interdisciplinary perspective. As the faculty teaches exclusively in French,  a  thorough  knowledge of the language is required. Our courses adopt a variety of approaches, including literary studies, film and media studies, social history of ideas, and the study of politics and popular culture.

Our program is known for its rigor. Unlike at universities and Ivy League institutions, faculty rather than graduate students teach our undergraduates in French. Study abroad in France or in another Francophone country is an integral part of our students’ training. Virtually all majors spend one semester abroad (see below).

Often our graduates have chosen to double major, in political science, economics, anthropology, comparative literature, or in the natural sciences; some opt to minor or concentrate in a related field, such as art history or international economic relations.

Learning Goals

We wish to empower our students to:

  1. Speak, read, and write in French with near-native proficiency.
  2. Engage the French and Francophone world and achieve cultural literacy.
  3. Become aware of cultural and linguistic diversity as global citizens who may someday work in the Francophone world.
  4. Communicate, with logic and empathy, among different perspectives and values especially in cross-cultural contexts.
  5. Think critically about texts, films, music, and fine arts as objects of inquiry.
  6. Analyze French and Francophone literatures as sources of human experience.
  7. Prepare for and pursue graduate studies, if they wish, in a variety of fields.

Haverford’s Institutional Learning Goals are available on the President’s website, at http://hav.to/learninggoals.

Curriculum

Unless they have not previously studied French, all entering students (first-year and transfers) who wish to pursue their study of French must take a placement examination upon entrance to Haverford. Those students who begin French have two options. They may study the language:

  • In the intensive sections (the sequence FREN 001IN–002IN of Intensive Elementary French, only at Bryn Mawr); or
  • In the non-intensive sections (the sequence FREN 001–002 of Non-Intensive Elementary French, on both campuses).

At the intermediate level students also have the choice to study the language non-intensively (the sequence FREN 003–004), or intensively (FREN 005):

  • FREN 003–004 (Non-Intensive Intermediate French) is a year-long course, requiring both semesters for credit. It is open to students who have taken FREN 001–002 or been placed by departmental examination.
  • FREN 005 (Intensive Intermediate French):
    • Is open only to students who have been specially placed by the departmental placement exam or to students who have taken the year-long Intensive Elementary course (at Bryn Mawr only). 

    • Requires its graduates to take FREN H102 (Introduction à l’analyse littéraire et culturelle II), or FREN H105 (Directions de la France contemporaine) in semester II for credit.

  • FREN 003 and FREN 005 are only offered in the fall semester.

Although it is possible to minor or major in French using either of the two sequences, we encourage students placed at the 001 level who are considering doing so to take the intensive option.

The 100-level courses introduce students to the study of French and Francophone literatures and cultures, and give special attention to the speaking and writing of French.

Courses at the 200-level are devoted to advanced language training (FREN H212 and FREN 260; you may not take both) and French and Francophone literatures and civilizations from the beginning to the present day.

Advanced (300-level) courses offer detailed study either of individual authors, genres, and movements or of particular periods, themes, and problems in French and Francophone cultures. For both options, the departments admit students to advanced courses after satisfactory completion of two semesters of 200-level courses in French.

The Department of French and Francophone Studies also cooperates with the departments of Italian (only at Bryn Mawr) and Spanish in the Romance Languages Major at Bryn Mawr.

Major Requirements

Starting with the class of 2023

Majors must acquire fluency in the French language, both written and oral.  Taking 212 or 260, or their equivalent when studying abroad, could help them to do so.

  • FREN 005–102 or 005–105; or FREN 101–102 or 101–105 (2 credits)
  • 200-level sequence: three courses, two of which (maximum) may be taken outside the department, and the Junior Seminar (JSEM). Courses taken outside the department should contribute to your independent program of study and have to be preapproved by your major advisor and entered in your major work plan. JSEM is offered each semester (4 credits)
  • 300-level sequence: two courses, one of which may be taken outside the department, pending pre-approval of your major advisor (2 credits)
  • Senior Experience: it consists of a thesis development workshop (Senior Seminar = FREN H398) in the fall semester and either a Senior Thesis (FREN H399) or a third 300-level course culminating in the Senior Essay during the spring semester. In either case, the work of the spring semester is capped by an oral defense (for details see The Senior Project section; 2 credits).

Senior Project

After taking Senior Conference in semester I of the senior year, students have the choice in semester II of writing a thesis in French (40-50 pp.) under the direction of a faculty member or taking a 300-level course in which they write a Senior Essay in French (15-25 pp.) The first choice offers self-selected students who already have developed a clearly defined subject in semester I the opportunity to pursue independent research and writing of the thesis with a faculty advisor. The second choice allows students, often double majors with another thesis, the opportunity to produce a substantial, but shorter, piece of work within the structure of their 300-level course in semester II.

Ideally, students willing to write a Senior Thesis define their subject, identify their advisors and start discussing the project with them by the end of the Junior Seminar. Discussion continues in the fall of senior year with the expectation that the student submit a thesis proposal in the context of the Senior Seminar. Depending on the transdisciplinary nature of the subject, the student may be advised to select a second reader in another department. The choice of the language (French or English) is made in consultation with the primary thesis advisor.

Senior Project Assessment

Both Senior Thesis and Senior Essay include a final oral defense lasting thirty minutes. At this time, the student is expected to speak with authority about the research, the writing process, and some of the intellectual ramifications of the work accomplished.

Senior Project Learning Goals

At the end of their career at Haverford, we expect our students to have achieved an extensive appreciation of French and Francophone literatures and cultures as well as an advanced level of linguistic and cultural fluency in French. We also require that they demonstrate the capacity to analyze a text and critically engage it in a sustained fashion, formulate an argument and present it intelligibly in both oral and written form. Whether writing a thesis or a senior paper they must show that they can conduct research efficiently.

Requirements for Honors

Students with a GPA of 3.7 or above are usually recommended for departmental honors.

Minor Requirements

  • FREN 005–102 or 005–105; or FREN 101–102 or 101–105 (2 credits).
  • Four courses at the 200 and 300 levels. At least one course must be at the 300 level (4 credits).

Related Programs

French Teacher Certification

The Department of French and Francophone Studies offers a certification program in secondary teacher education. For more information, see the description of the Education Program.

French A.B./M.A. Program

Particularly well-qualified students may undertake work toward the joint A.B./M.A. degree in French. Students may complete such a program in four or five years and undertake it with the approval of the department and of the dean of Bryn Mawr’s Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

Study Abroad

Study abroad in France is an integral part of our departmental training. We expect, among other things, students majoring or minoring in our department to achieve an advanced linguistic and cultural fluency in French. Therefore, we highly recommend that they participate in a study abroad program in France, preferably for one semester during the junior year with one of the programs recommended by the College. Other valuable options do exist, including the Institut d’Avignon program offered by Bryn Mawr College during the summer intersession.

Before going abroad for a semester-long program during junior year, students must have:

  • declared their major or minor by the end of sophomore year;
  • completed the 100-level series of French courses or one course at the 200-level during the semester prior to departure.

Faculty

Koffi Anyinefa
Professor of French and Francophone Studies

Kathryne Corbin
Assistant Professor of French and Francophone Studies; Coordinator of Gender and Sexuality Studies; Visual Culture, Arts, and Media Faculty Fellow (2019-2021)

Christophe Corbin
Visiting Assistant Professor of French and Francophone Studies

Maren Daniel
Visiting Instructor of French and Francophone Studies

David Sedley
Associate Professor and Chair of French and Francophone Studies

Faculty at Bryn Mawr

Penny Armstrong
Eunice M. Schenck 1907 Professor of French and Director of Middle Eastern Languages

Christophe Corbin
Visiting Assistant Professor of French and Francophone Studies

Edwige Crucifix
Assistant Professor of French

Rudy Le Menthéour
Chair and Associate Professor of French

Brigitte Mahuzier
Professor of French

Agnès Peysson-Zeiss
Lecturer of French

Corine Ragueneau Wells
Instructor

Julien Suaudeau
Lecturer in French

Courses at Haverford

FREN H001  ELEMENTARY FRENCH  (1.0 Credit)

Maren Daniel

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts)

The speaking and understanding of French are emphasized particularly during the first semester. The work includes regular use of the Language Learning Center and is supplemented by intensive oral practice sessions. The course meets in intensive (nine hours each week) and non-intensive (five hours each week) sections. This is a year-long course; both semesters (001 and 002) are required for credit.

(Offered: Fall 2020)

FREN H002  ELEMENTARY FRENCH NON INTENSIVE  (1.0 Credit)

Christophe Corbin

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts)

The speaking and understanding of French are emphasized particularly during the first semester. The work includes regular use of the Language Learning Center and is supplemented by intensive oral practice sessions. The course meets in intensive (nine hours each week) and non-intensive (five hours each week) sections. This is a year-long course; both semesters (001 and 002) are required for credit.

(Offered: Spring 2021)

FREN H003  INTERMEDIATE FRENCH NON INTENSIVE  (1.0 Credit)

Christophe Corbin, David Sedley

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts)

The emphasis on speaking and understanding French is continued, texts from French literature and cultural media are read, and short papers are written in French. Students use the Language Learning Center regularly and attend supplementary oral practice sessions. The course meets in non-intensive (three hours each week) sections which are supplemented by an extra hour per week with an assistant. This is a year-long course; both semesters (003 and 004) are required for credit. Prerequisite(s): FREN 001 and 002, or French placement exam.

(Offered: Fall 2020)

FREN H004  INTERMEDIATE FRENCH  (1.0 Credit)

Kathryne Corbin, Koffi Anyinefa

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts)

The emphasis on speaking and understanding French is continued, texts from French literature and cultural media are read, and short papers are written in French. Students use the Language Learning Center regularly and attend supplementary oral practice sessions. The course meets in non-intensive (three hours each week) sections which are supplemented by an extra hour per week with an assistant. This is a year-long course; both semesters (003 and 004) are required for credit. Prerequisite(s): FREN 001 and 002, or French placement exam

(Offered: Spring 2021)

FREN H101  INTRODUCTION À L'ANALYSE LITTÉRAIRE ET CULTURELLE I  (1.0 Credit)

David Sedley, Kathryne Corbin

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts)

Presentation of essential problems in literary and cultural analysis by close reading of works selected from various periods and genres and by analysis of voice and image in French writing and film. Participation in discussion and practice in written and oral expression are emphasized, as are grammar review and laboratory exercises. Prerequisite(s): FREN 003 and 004, or French placement exam

(Offered: Fall 2020)

FREN H102  INTRODUCTION A L'ANALYSE LITTERAIRE ET CULTURELLE II  (1.0 Credit)

David Sedley

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts)

Continued development of students’ expertise in literary and cultural analysis by emphasizing close reading as well as oral and written analyses of works chosen from various genres and periods of French/Francophone works in their written and visual modes. Readings begin with comic theatre of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries and build to increasingly complex nouvelles, poetry, and novels of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Participation in guided discussion and practice in oral/written expression continue to be emphasized, as are grammar review and laboratory exercises. Offered in second semester. Prerequisite(s): FREN 005 or 101

(Offered: Spring 2021)

FREN H105  DIRECTIONS DE LA FRANCE CONTEMPORAINE  (1.0 Credit)

Kathryne Corbin

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts)

An examination of contemporary society in France and Francophone cultures as portrayed in recent documents and film. Emphasizing the tension in contemporary French-speaking societies between tradition and change, the course focuses on subjects such as family structures and the changing role of women, cultural and linguistic identity, an increasingly multiracial society, the individual and institutions (religious, political, educational), and les loisirs. In addition to the basic text and review of grammar, readings are chosen from newspapers, contemporary literary texts, magazines, and they are complemented by video materials. Offered in the second semester. Prerequisite(s): FREN 005 or 101

(Offered: Spring 2021)

FREN H202  CULTURE, FRANCE, RENAISSANCE  (1.0 Credit)

David Sedley

Division: Humanities

The topic of this course is not only sixteenth-century French culture but also the development of the basic elements that the idea of “French culture” presupposes: that of “culture” and that of “France.” How did these notions come about, and how were they fused into one entity? We will study this peculiar process, fundamental to Western modernity, by taking into account a series of Renaissance masterpieces in various genres (novel, story, essay, poetry, painting, architecture) as well as critical perspectives on such works from our own era. Through this exploration, we will attempt to understand how new senses of identity, on national as well as individual levels (France and the self), took shape in a context of political and religious fragmentation (civil war and Reformation). In French. Prerequisite(s): FREN 101 and 102/105, or 005 and 102/105

(Offered: Spring 2021)

FREN H203  THÉÂTRE ET RAISON D'ÉTAT EN FRANCE AU GRAND SIÈCLE  (1.0 Credit)

David Sedley

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts)

What makes a culture "great"? A good place to explore this question is 17th-century France. It is often thought that during this century, French culture became great—hence the century's nickname, le grand siècle. In this course we will consider the hypothesis of French grandeur, but not to assess it as true or false. Rather, we will approach it as a notion that gets constructed, applied, and interrogated in the 1600s through a series of theatrical, political, architectural, theological, and scientific œuvres. These works—mainly by Molière, Madame de Lafayette, Racine, Pascal, Corneille, Descartes, and André Le Nôtre—differ radically in their ideas, forms, perspectives, and effects. Nevertheless, they are all regarded in France as "classics" in that they serve in the classroom as essential ingredients of an education. The significance of this class, therefore, extends beyond the specific period it covers to include French culture in general and the values that it may (or may not) have today. In French. Prerequisite(s): FREN 101 and 102/105, or 005 and 102/105

FREN H212  GRAMMAIRE AVANCÉE: COMPOSITION ET CONVERSATION  (1.0 Credit)

Christophe Corbin

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts)

The principal objective of this course is to allow its participants to master the techniques of composition and to write with a growing ease in order to express themselves with pertinent and original ideas. Students will contribute to the creation of an online news blog and will experiment with writing different genres of journalism, as well as editing a televised news segment. Assigned readings on current news and films will be the subject of discussion. The course will allow students to improve their written and oral French, to revise certain important aspects of French grammar, to develop their analytical and critical senses, and to develop their knowledge of French and francophone culture. Prerequisite(s): FREN 101 and 102/105, or 005 and 102/105

(Offered: Fall 2020)

FREN H213  APPROCHES CRITIQUES ET THÉORIQUES  (1.0 Credit)

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts)

This course provides exposure to influential Twentieth-Century French theorists while bringing these thinkers to bear on appropriate literary texts. It hones students’ critical skills while expanding their knowledge of French intellectual history. The explicitly critical aspect of the course will also serve students throughout their coursework, regardless of field. Prerequisite(s): FREN 101 and 102/105, or 005 and 102/105

FREN H225  POLITIQUE ET POÉTIQUE: LA FEMME ET LA PRESSE QUOTIDIENNE (1836-1918)  (1.0 Credit)

Kathryne Corbin

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts)

In this course, we consider pivotal moments in French culture, society, and history from the perspectives of women witnesses. The first generation of women journalists modernized the image of the woman and gave new representation to women in the press. Cross Listed: Gender and Sexuality Studies, Visual Studies Prerequisite(s): French 101-102 or French 101-105; or instructor permission

(Offered: Fall 2020)

FREN H255  CINÉMA FRANÇAIS/FRANCOPHONE ET COLONIALISME  (1.0 Credit)

Koffi Anyinefa

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts)

Cross-listed in Comparative Literature. A study of French and Francophone films dealing with the colonial and post-colonial experience. Humatities (HU).

FREN H312  ADVANCED TOPICS:ÊTRE ET NE PAS ÊTRE: POUR UNE HISTOIRE DE LA SUBJECTIVITÉ AU 20E SIÈCLE.  (1.0 Credit)

Koffi Anyinefa

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts)

To Be, Not to Be: Subjectivities of the 20th Century Who am I? What is “I”? Does the so called first person stand for a human subject? This interdisciplinary seminar, equally open to art and to philosophy, aims to excavate the causes of the tragic destiny of human subjectivity during the 20thcentury. Along with Beckett, Deleuze and Foucault, we will read some earlier authors who foretold this apocalyptic future of the Self, including Nietzsche, Maupassant and Rimbaud. Crosslisted: French, Comparative Literature Prerequisite(s): At least one 200-level course

(Offered: Spring 2021)

FREN H312A  ADVANCED TOPICS IN FRENCH LITERATURE: L'ÉDUCATION ET SES SUJETS DE LA RENAISSANCE AUX LUMIÈRES  (1.0 Credit)

David Sedley

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts)

The goal of this course is to put modern theories and practices of education into historical perspective by looking at some of their early-modern French and European counterparts. We will focus on how a cluster of its "subjects"—both things that are studied and people who study them—developed into fixtures of modern education. These educational subjects include inclusivity, civility, technology, essays, literature, images, theater, and algorithms. We will read early-modern authors such as Rabelais, Montaigne, Marie de Gournay, Elisabeth de Bohème, Poullain de la Barre, Racine, and Rousseau. We will also read selections from recent pedagogical theory in order to see whether and how they reflect, reform, or reject early-modern ideas. Crosslisted: FREN and COML

(Offered: Fall 2020)

FREN H325  TOPICS: ETUDES AVANCÉES: L'HUMAIN ET L'ENVIRONNEMENT  (1.0 Credit)

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts); B: Analysis of the Social World

This environmental humanities course will take an ecocritical approach to analyze French literature and culture in the era of globalization. The goal of this course is to reveal how new ideologies embedded in a wide array of media advocate for a shift away from the dominant paradigm of anthropocentrism. By the analysis of literary texts and social science texts that range from seemingly non-partisan to openly activist, students will gain familiarity with current critical trends such as Animal Studies, Critical Plant Studies and the Post-human.

FREN H398  SENIOR CONFERENCE  (1.0 Credit)

Koffi Anyinefa

Division: Humanities

A weekly seminar examining representative French and Francophone literary texts and cultural documents from all periods, and the interpretive problems they raise. Close reading and dissection of texts, complemented by extensive secondary readings from different schools of interpretation, prepare students to analyze others critical stances and to develop their own. In addition to short essays and oral presentations, students write a long paper each semester and end the year with Senior Comprehensives, which consist of an oral explication of a French literary text or cultural document and a four-hour written examination.

FREN H399  SENIOR THESIS  (1.0 Credit)

Division: Humanities

(Offered: Spring 2021)

Courses at Bryn Mawr

FREN B001  ELEMENTARY FRENCH  (1.0 Credit)

Corine Ragueneau Wells

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts)

The speaking and understanding of French are emphasized particularly during the first semester, and written competence is stressed as well in semester II. The work includes intensive oral practice sessions. The course meets five hours a week in non-intensive sections. This is a year-long course and students must register for both semesters.

(Offered: Fall 2020)

FREN B001IN  INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY FRENCH  (1.5 Credits)

Agnès Peysson-Zeiss

Division: Humanities

French 001 Intensive Elementary is the first half of a two-semester beginning sequence designed to help students attain a level of proficiency to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. It is both speaking-intensive (through pair work, group work and drills) and writing-intensive (through blogs and essays). In drill sessions, students develop the ability to speak and understand increasingly well through songs, skits, debates, and a variety of activities. The course meets nine hours per week.

(Offered: Fall 2020)

FREN B002  ELEMENTARY FRENCH  (1.0 Credit)

Corine Ragueneau Wells

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts)

The speaking and understanding of French are emphasized particularly during the first semester, and written competence is stressed as well in semester II. The work includes intensive oral practice sessions. The course meets in non-intensive (five hours a week) sections. This is a year-long course.

(Offered: Spring 2021)

FREN B002IN  INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY FRENCH  (1.5 Credits)

Agnès Peysson-Zeiss

Division: Humanities

The second half of a two-semester beginning sequence designed to help students attain a level of proficiency to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. It is both speaking-intensive (through pair work, group work and drills) and writing-intensive (through blogs and essays). In drill sessions, students develop the ability to speak and understand increasingly well through songs, skits, debates, and a variety of activities. Class meets nine hours per week.

(Offered: Spring 2021)

FREN B003  INTERMEDIATE FRENCH  (1.0 Credit)

Edwige Crucifix, Julien Suaudeau

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts)

The emphasis on speaking, understanding, and writing French is continued; texts from French literature and cultural media are read; and short papers are written in French. Students regularly attend supplementary oral practice sessions. The course meets in non-intensive (three hours a week) sections that are supplemented by an extra hour per week with an assistant. This is a year-long course. Prerequisite: FREN B002 or placement required.

(Offered: Fall 2020)

FREN B004  INTERMEDIATE FRENCH  (1.0 Credit)

Edwige Crucifix, Julien Suaudeau

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts)

The emphasis on speaking, understanding, and writing French is continued; texts from French literature and cultural media are read; and short papers are written in French. Students regularly attend supplementary oral practice sessions. The course meets in non-intensive (three hours a week) sections that are supplemented by an extra hour per week with an assistant. This is a year-long course.

(Offered: Spring 2021)

FREN B005  INTENSIVE INTERMEDIATE FRENCH  (1.5 Credits)

Agnès Peysson-Zeiss, Corine Ragueneau Wells

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts)

The emphasis on speaking and understanding French is continued; literary and cultural texts are read and increasingly longer papers are written in French. In addition to three class meetings a week, students develop their skills in group sessions with the professors and in oral practice hours with assistants. Students use internet resources regularly. This course prepares students to take 102 or 105 in semester II. Open only to graduates of Intensive Elementary French or to students placed by the department. Students who did not complete Intensive Elementary French must take either 102 or 105 to receive language credit. Two additional hours of instruction outside class time required. Additional meeting hours on Tuesday and Thursday will be scheduled according to students availability. Prerequisite: FREN B002IN (intensive) or Placement exam. Approach: Course does not meet an Approach

(Offered: Fall 2020)

FREN B101  INTRODUCTION À L’ANALYSE LITTÉRAIRE ET CULTURELLE I  (1.0 Credit)

Agnès Peysson-Zeiss

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts)

Presentation of essential problems in literary and cultural analysis by close reading of works selected from various periods and genres and by analysis of voice and image in French writing and film from female and male authors in Metropolitan France, Africa, and other Francophone regions. Participation in discussion and practice in written and oral expression are emphasized, as are grammar review and exercises. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: FREN B004, placement, or permission of instructor.

(Offered: Fall 2020)

FREN B102  INTRODUCTION À L’ANALYSE LITTÉRAIRE ET CULTURELLE II  (1.0 Credit)

Penny Armstrong

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts)

Continued development of students’ expertise in literary and cultural analysis by emphasizing close reading as well as oral and written analyses of increasingly complex works chosen from various genres and periods of French and Francophone works in their written and visual modes. Readings include theater of the 17th or 18th centuries and build to increasingly complex nouvelles, poetry and novels of the 19th and 20th centuries. Participation in guided discussion and practice in oral/written expression continue to be emphasized, as is grammar review. Prerequisite: FREN 005 or 101.

(Offered: Spring 2021)

FREN B105  DIRECTIONS DE LA FRANCE CONTEMPORAINE  (1.0 Credit)

Christophe Corbin, Julien Suaudeau

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts)

An examination of contemporary society in France and Francophone cultures as portrayed in recent documents and film. Emphasizing the tension in contemporary French-speaking societies between tradition and change, the course focuses on subjects such as family structures and the changing role of women, cultural and linguistic identity, an increasingly multiracial society, the individual and institutions (religious, political, educational), and “les loisirs”. In addition to the basic text and review of grammar, readings are chosen from newspapers, contemporary literary texts and magazines, complemented by video materials. Prerequisite: FREN 005 or 101.

(Offered: Spring 2021)

FREN B201  LE CHEVALIER, LA DAME ET LE PRÊTRE: AMOUR ET VIOLENCE AU MOYEN AGE  (1.0 Credit)

Penny Armstrong

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts)

Using literary texts, historical documents and letters as a mirror of the social classes that they address, this interdisciplinary course studies the principal preoccupations of secular and religious female and male authors in France and Norman England from the eleventh century through the fifteenth. Selected works from epic, lais, roman courtois, fabliaux, theater, letters, and contemporary biography are read in modern French translation. Prerequisite: FREN 102 or 105.

FREN B204  LE SIÈCLE DES LUMIÈRES  (1.0 Credit)

Rudy Le Menthéour

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts)

Representative texts of the Enlightenment with emphasis on the development of liberal thought as illustrated in the Encyclopédie and the works of Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, and Rousseau. Prerequisites: FREN 102 or 105 or French Placement Exam (200-leverl or higher).

FREN B207  INTRODUCTION À LA LITTÉRATURE DU 20ÈME ET 21ÈME SIÈCLE  (1.0 Credit)

Edwige Crucifix

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts)

A study of selected works illustrating the principal literary movements from 1900 to the present. Depending on the professor, this class will focus on various authors and literary movements of the 20th century such as Surrealism, Modernism, the Nouveau Roman, Oulipo, as well as works from the broader Francophone world. Prerequisites: FREN 102 or 105. Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)

(Offered: Fall 2020)

FREN B208  VISIBLE MINORITIES: DIVERSITY IN CONTEMPORARY FRENCH CINEMA  (1.0 Credit)

Julien Suaudeau

Until the closing years of the 20th century, ethnic diversity was virtually absent from French cinema. While Francophone directors from Northern and Sub-Saharan Africa debunked colonialism and neocolonialism in their films, minorities hardly appeared on French screens. Movies were made by white filmmakers for a white audience. Since the 1980's and the 1990's, minorities have become more visible in French films. Are French Blacks and Arabs portrayed in French cinema beyond stereotypes, or are they still objects of a euro-centric gaze? Have minorities gained agency in storytelling, not just as actors, but as directors? What is the national narrative at play in the recent French films that focus on diversity? Is it still "us against them", or has the new generation of French filmmakers found a way to include the different components of French identity into a collective subject? From Bouchareb to Gomis, from Kechiche to Benyamina and Jean-Baptiste, this course will map out the visual fault lines of the French self and examine the prospects for a post-republican sense of community. Open to non-majors. There will be a weekly screening on Sunday, 7:00pm-9:00pm.

FREN B213  THEORY IN PRACTICE:CRITICAL DISCOURSES IN THE HUMANITIES  (1.0 Credit)

Edwige Crucifix

Division: Humanities

By bringing together the study of major theoretical currents of the 20th century and the practice of analyzing literary works in the light of theory, this course aims at providing students with skills to use literary theory in their own scholarship. The selection of theoretical readings reflects the history of theory (psychoanalysis, structuralism, narratology), as well as the currents most relevant to the contemporary academic field: Post-structuralism, Post-colonialism, Gender Studies, and Ecocriticism. They are paired with a diverse range of short stories (Poe, Kafka, Camus, Borges, Calvino, Morrison, Djebar, Ngozi Adichie) that we discuss along with our study of theoretical texts. The class will be conducted in English with an additional hour in French for students wishing to take it for French credit.

(Offered: Spring 2021)

FREN B214  FRENCH THEATER WORKSHOP  (1.0 Credit)

How do we best learn a language? By speaking it and by being completely immersed in it. We also learn best when we play. When we have fun and are creative. This workshop will immerse the students in a French only speaking class and they will practice French on their feet. Students will be invited to improvise in French, to create little scenes in French and finally to work on a scene or a monologue from the French repertoire. The class will start with teaching very specific theatrical skills to push the students not only in their ability to speak French but also to act! This will enhance their confidence in speaking, thinking and performing in French, which will lead them to a better mastery of the language.

FREN B219  DIASPORIC VOICES: VOYAGES AND IDENTITY NARRATIVES  (1.0 Credit)

Agnès Peysson-Zeiss

Erin Mouré’s quote “once you cross a border, the border is not the same any longer” raises the question of identity and interrogates territorial integrity, wondering how people and communities morph after such life changing events. In this course, students will question the very notion of experience and being through travel; as well as its meaning in terms of identity, locus, and language. Through the works offered, we invite students to approach icons, visual and written texts with new theories and fresh eyes to interrogate the ethics of travel writing, filming and documenting, looking for ways to empower readers about history and migrations. Students will reflect on the types of travels: temporary or voluntary travels, migration under various forms of duress (violence, war, economic penury, persecution for reasons of religion, politics or sexual identity). The works read and seen will encourage discussions about reasons for leaving home and invite a scrutiny about how travel writers and filmmakers gaze and inscribe it on the page or the screen. We will then examine narratives dealing with the relationship of former colonies with its “métropole,” reading texts from various regions including France, raising the question of identity. There will be an extra hour for students taking it for credit towards French minor. Prerequisite: FREN B102 or B105 if counting towards French major or minor.

(Offered: Spring 2021)

FREN B221  FEMME SUJET/FEMME OBJET  (1.0 Credit)

Penny Armstrong

Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts)

An in-depth examination of how women authors from selected periods conceive of their art, construct authority for themselves, and, where appropriate, distinguish themselves from male colleagues, of whom several who have assumed female voices/perspective will be examined as points of comparison. It introduces students to the techniques and topics of selected women writers (as well as theoretical approaches to them) from the most recent (Djebar and M. Duras) to late Medieval authors. This course is taught in French. Prerequisite: FREN 102 or 105

FREN B223  THE FIRE EVERY TIME: CINEMATIC REBELS ACROSS THE ATLANTIC  (1.0 Credit)

Julien Suaudeau

Cinema, as an art form, can be seen as a rebellion against reality. Then again, cinema as mass entertainment with uber-industrial might can yield the most contagious legitimization of power and social norms. Can filmmakers be genuine agents of change and social justice? Do their creations have the power to disrupt the status quo? If so, how are some films designed to subvert systemic normalization and disseminated forms of domination? In this course, we will map out rebellious modern (post WW2) cinema from both sides of the Atlantic. Setting aside chronology and conventional delimitations, we will go back and forth across genres (war film, thriller, ghost story, social realism, drama…) between contemporary and older avatars of cinematic resistance, between documentary and fiction, and between France, the U.S., West Africa and Latin America. We will investigate a series of films that focus on non-compliance and individual resilience in the face of systemic adversity, while sharing a common oppositional ethos applied to different forms of domination/violence: anticolonialism, anti-capitalism, antiracism, as well as ecology, pacifism and a critique of carceral institutions. For each of them, we will study how the style of cinematography is designed not just to support a narrative, but as a counter-language aimed at subverting the conservative grammar codes of the mainstream. This course will be taught in English. Prerequisites: FREN 102 or 105 only for students taking this for French credit with additional hour.

(Offered: Fall 2020)

FREN B260  ATELIER D'ÉCRITURE  (1.0 Credit)

Julien Suaudeau

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts)

Intensive practice in speaking and writing. Conversation, discussion, advanced training in grammar and stylistics.

(Offered: Spring 2021)

FREN B275  IMPROVING MANKIND: ENLIGHTENED HYGIENE AND EUGENICS  (1.0 Credit)

Rudy Le Menthéour

At first sight, hygiene and eugenics have nothing in common: the former is usually conceived as a good management of our everyday conditions of life, whereas the latter is commonly reviled for having inspired discriminatory practices (in Nazi Germany, but also in the US, Sweden, and Switzerland). Our inquiry will explore how, in the context of the French Enlightenment, a subdiscipline of Medicine (namely Hygiene) was redefined, expanded its scope, and eventually became hegemonic both in the medical field and in civil society. We will also explore how and why a philanthropic ideal led to the quest for the improvement of the human species. We will compare the French situation with that of other countries (mainly UK and the USA). This course is taught in English. Students who wish to get credit in French will meet one extra hour. Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)

FREN B306  LIBERTINAGE ET SUBVERSION  (1.0 Credit)

Rudy Le Menthéour

Division: Humanities

The libertine movement of the 18th century has long been condemned for moral reasons or considered of minor importance when compared to the Enlightenment. Yet, the right to happiness (‘droit au bonheur’) celebrated by the so-called ‘Philosophes’ implies a duty to experience pleasure (‘devoir de jouir’). This is what the libertine writers promoted. The libertine movement thus does not confine itself to literature, but also involves a dimension of social subversion. This course will allow you to understand Charles Baudelaire’s enigmatic comment: “the Revolution was made by voluptuaries.” Prerequisite: two 200-level courses or permission of instructor.

FREN B312  ADVANCED TOPICS IN LITERATURE  (1.0 Credit)

Brigitte Mahuzier

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts)

This is a topics course. Course content varies. Prerequisites: two 200-level courses.

FREN B325  TOPICS: ETUDES AVANCÉES  (1.0 Credit)

Staff

Division: Humanities

An in-depth study of a particular topic, event or historical figure in French civilization. This is a topics course. Course content varies. The seminar topic rotates among many subjects: La Révolution française: Histoire, littérature et culture; L’environnement naturel dans la culture française; Mal et valeurs éthiques; Le Cinéma et la politique, 1940-1968; Le Nationalisme en France et dans les pays francophones; Étude socio-culturelle des arts du manger en France du Moyen Age à nos jours; Crimes et criminalité; Ecrire la Grande Guerre: 1914-10; Le "Rentrée Littéraire”; Proust/Baudelaire; L’Humain et l’environnement.

(Offered: Fall 2020)

FREN B326  ETUDES AVANCÉES  (1.0 Credit)

Brigitte Mahuzier

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts)

An in-depth study of a particular topic, event or historical figure in French civilization. This is a topics course. Course content varies.

FREN B350  VOIX MÉDIÉVALES ET ÉCHOS MODERNES  (1.0 Credit)

Penny Armstrong

Division: Humanities

A study of selected 19th- and 20th-century works inspired by medieval subjects, such as the Grail and Arthurian legends and the Tristan and Yseut stories, and by medieval genres, such as the roman, saints’ lives, or the miracle play. Among the texts and films studied are works by Bonnefoy, Cocteau, Flaubert, Genevoix, Giono, and Gracq.

(Offered: Spring 2021)

FREN B398  SENIOR CONFERENCE  (1.0 Credit)

Penny Armstrong

Division: Humanities

This weekly thesis development workshop examines French and Francophone literary texts and cultural documents from all periods, and the interpretive problems they raise. Close reading, complemented by extensive secondary readings from different schools of interpretation, prepare students to analyze other critical stances and to develop their own.

(Offered: Fall 2020)

FREN B400  THESIS ADVISING  (1.0 Credit)

Agnès Peysson-Zeiss, Edwige Crucifix, Julien Suaudeau, Penny Armstrong

Division: Humanities

Weekly or bi-weekly meetings with your thesis advisor will allow you to write your senior thesis efficiently and to prepare for a successful defense.

(Offered: Fall 2020, Spring 2021)

FREN B403  SUPERVISED WORK  (1.0 Credit)

Agnès Peysson-Zeiss, Julien Suaudeau, Penny Armstrong, Staff

Division: Humanities

(Offered: Fall 2020, Spring 2021)

FREN B425  TRANSLATION PRAXIS  (0.5 Credit)

Agnès Peysson-Zeiss

This Praxis course partners with advocacy organizations to help translate documents from French into English. Topics and projects varies.

FREN B701  SUPERVISED WORK  (1.0 Credit)

Agnès Peysson-Zeiss, Julien Suaudeau, Penny Armstrong, Staff

(Offered: Spring 2021)