Independent College Programs

Department Website:
https://www.haverford.edu/icpr

Independent College Programs (ICPR) supports courses that expand and enhance the curricular opportunities at Haverford College.

These courses, offered by visiting professors and members of the various departments of the College, are in different ways outside the major programs of the departments. They may be introductory in approach, or they may be interdisciplinary, bringing the insights and techniques of one discipline to bear on the problems important to another. They attempt to introduce students to intellectual experiences that are different from the ones available in our departmental curricula, although in recent years ICPR has served as something of an incubator for new interests and themes in the curriculum, such as health studies, visual studies, and environmental studies.

The courses have no prerequisites, except where explicitly stated.

Concentrations & Interdisciplinary Minors

Some of the faculty affiliated with ICPR teach courses that count towards various concentrations and interdisciplinary minors. Students should read more about the role these play in the curriculum under the Catalog descriptions for the individual programs in question.

Faculty

Anne Balay
Visiting Assistant Professor of Independent College Programs; Coordinator of Gender and Sexuality Studies

Sue Benston
Visiting Professor of Independent College Programs

Linda Gerstein
Professor of History; Chair of Independent College Programs

Neal Grabell
Visiting Professor of Economics and Independent College Programs

David Harrington Watt
Douglas & Dorothy Steere Professor of Quaker Studies

Eric Hartman
Executive Director of the Center for Peace and Global Citizenship

Kristin Lindgren  
Visiting Assistant Professor of Independent College Programs and Health Studies

Carol Schilling
Visiting Professor of Independent College Programs and Health Studies

Affiliated Faculty

Thomas Donahue
Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science

Victoria Funari
HCAH Visual Media Scholar

Christina Knight
Assistant Professor and Director of Visual Studies

Anne Montgomery
Visiting Assistant Professor of Health Studies

Shannon Mudd
Director of Microfinance, Impact Investing, and Social Entrepreneurial Programs; Visiting Assistant Professor of Economics

John Muse
HCAH Visual Media Scholar

Zolani Ngwane
Associate Professor and Chair of Anthropology

Judith Owen
The Elizabeth Ufford Green Professor of Natural Sciences; Professor of Biology

Aniko Szucs
Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow; Visiting Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature

Anna West
Assistant Professor and Coordinator of Health Studies

Terrance Wiley
Assistant Professor of Religion

Courses

ICPR H110J  BELONGING AND BECOMING AT HAVERFORD COLLEGE  (0.5 Credit)

This course creates a curricular space dedicated to acknowledging, exploring, and acting on diversity and inclusion as experienced (differently) by members of our community and working collaboratively toward greater equity. This course is graded universal P/F in which no numerical grade is assigned. Cross Listed: none Prerequisites: Only open to sophomores

(Offered: Fall 2020)

ICPR H112  GLOBAL SOLIDARITY AND LOCAL ACTIONS: INTERDEPENDENCE, SOCIAL CHANGE, AND HAVERFORD  (1.0 Credit)

Nora Reynolds

Division: Social Science
Domain(s): B: Analysis of the Social World

This course embraces global interdependence while considering how individual identities relate to appropriate local civic actions. Participants review ideas and methods relevant for co-creating more just, inclusive, sustainable communities, advancing inquiry in dialogue with community-based partners of Haverford College.

(Offered: Fall 2020)

ICPR H141  PAPER AND INK: THE HISTORY, CULTURE, AND SCIENCE  (0.5 Credit)

Karin Åkerfeldt, Terry Snyder, William Bumbarger

Using the Haverford library and special collection, as well as other archives, we will explore the history of human development and thought through the evolution of paper and ink. We will trace the art of papermaking and study its history and scientific advancement by researching literature for answers to a range of questions. This course is graded pass/fail.

(Offered: Fall 2020)

ICPR H142  WOMEN AND GENDER IN THE MIDDLE AGES: REPRESENTATIONS IN ART  (0.5 Credit)

Margaret Schaus

Students will learn about issues involving women and gender in the European Middle Ages. Through discussion and research, students will analyze medieval art and create image records for the database, Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index. This course is graded pass/fail.

(Offered: Spring 2021)

ICPR H143  ILLUSTRATED BOOKS: HISTORY, PROCESS, AND ANALYSIS  (0.5 Credit)

Sarah Horowitz

What does it mean for books to be illustrated? How do illustrations interact with other parts of books? Students will explore books created for a variety of audiences over time and space, creating exhibits on a topic of interest. This course is graded P/F.

(Offered: Spring 2021)

ICPR H144  INTRODUCTION TO MIDI FILM SCORING  (0.5 Credit)

Guillermo Gómez

Introduction to film scoring using computers, software instruments and MIDI. A hands-on course in the techniques and technology necessary for writing and recording music for film using computers and MIDI. This course is graded P/F. Prerequisite(s): Some musical knowledge helpful but not necessary

(Offered: Spring 2021)

ICPR H145  SOME ASSEMBLY REQUIRED: DESIGNING OBJECTS OF PLAY  (0.5 Credit)

Staff

Emphasizing digital design and remote digital fabrication, this course invites students to think critically about objects of play. What materials are used in toy design? What are the environmental implications of mass production? How can thinking about communities of play help us imagine solutions to problems of isolation? This course is graded P/F. Crosslisted: Independent College Programs, Visual Studies

(Offered: Fall 2020)

ICPR H146  ETHICS AND THE USE OF MATHEMATICS, WITH A FOCUS ON ANTI-RACISM  (0.5 Credit)

Charles Cunningham, Joshua Sabloff, Rebecca Everett, Robert Manning, Tarik Aougab, Weiwen Miao

This seminar will explore what it means to “do math ethically”, to emphasize the ways in which mathematics is inherently political, and to think about anti-racism in mathematical disciplines. This course is graded P/F. Crosslisted: Independent College Programs, Mathematics

(Offered: Fall 2020)

ICPR H190  INTRODUCTION TO FEMINIST AND GENDER STUDIES  (1.0 Credit)

Bridget Gurtler

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts); B: Analysis of the Social World

This course introduces students to major debates and issues within the interdisciplinary field of Feminist and Gender Studies. We will explore what feminist scholars have illuminated about the construction of gender and sexuality in multiple historic, present-day, and global contexts. Students will examine feminist debates about how race, class, and religion shape gender and sexuality in unequal ways. And, students will develop the skills to analyze how gender and sexuality have been regulated, reinforced, and transgressed in diverse settings.

(Offered: Fall 2020, Spring 2021)

ICPR H191  WEB APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT  (0.5 Credit)

Andrew Janco

In this course, students will gain practical experience in building and designing web applications. Students will learn to use Python web frameworks (FastAPI and Django), JavaScript, and jQuery as well as HTML/CSS, Bootstrap, and databases. This course is graded pass/fail and does not count for the major. Crosslisted: Independent College Programs, Computer Science Prerequisite(s): Some familiarity with the Python programming language would be helpful, but not required.

(Offered: Fall 2020)

ICPR H223  MENTAL AFFLICTION: THE DISEASE OF THOUGHT  (1.0 Credit)

Sue Benston

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts); B: Analysis of the Social World

Drawing on illness memoirs, literary fiction, case histories, and essays in neuroscience, physics, and philosophy of mind, this course will explore how far the vehicle of language can transport us into turbulent mental landscapes without itself breaking down. The syllabus will feature selections from numerous authors such as Nancy Andreasen, John Barth, Samuel Beckett, Jorge Luis Borges, Robert Coover, Antonio Damasio, Daniel Dennett, Julie Holland, Clarice Lispector, Vladimir Nabokov, Thomas Nagel, Steven Pinker, Fernando Pessoa, Elyn Saks, Lawrence Shainberg, Max Tegmark, and Lu Xun. Crosslisted: Health Studies, Independent College Programs

ICPR H246  MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP  (1.0 Credit)

Neal Grabell

Division: Social Science

A study of the managerial functions of planning, organizing, leading and controlling resources to accomplish organizational goals. Focusing on leadership and ethics, this course will consider the role, skills, techniques and responsibilities of managers in business, non-profit, and other organizations.

(Offered: Spring 2021)

ICPR H247  FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING  (1.0 Credit)

Neal Grabell

Division: Social Science
Domain(s): B: Analysis of the Social World

An introduction to financial accounting concepts, financial reporting, and managerial accounting. The course will address how accounting measures, records, and reports economic activities for business entities and how decision makers analyze, interpret, and use accounting information. COURSE MAY NOT BE USED TOWARDS THE ECONOMICS MAJOR or MINOR AT HAVERFORD. Crosslisted: Economics, Independent College Programs

(Offered: Fall 2020, Spring 2021)

ICPR H247B  FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING  (1.0 Credit)

Neal Grabell

Division: Social Science
Domain(s): B: Analysis of the Social World

An introduction to financial accounting concepts, financial reporting, and managerial accounting. The course will address how accounting measures, records, and reports economic activities for business entities and how decision makers analyze, interpret, and use accounting information. COURSE MAY NOT BE USED TOWARDS THE ECONOMICS MAJOR or MINOR AT HAVERFORD. Crosslisted: Economics, Independent College Programs

(Offered: Fall 2020, Spring 2021)

ICPR H258  AMERICAN QUEEN: DRAG IN CONTEMPORARY ART AND PERFORMANCE  (1.0 Credit)

Christina Knight

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts)

An interdisciplinary visual studies examination of queer subcultural performance and its influence on contemporary American culture. Readings include live performance, visual art and film as well as historical and theoretical secondary sources. Prerequisite(s): an intro course in Gen/Sex

ICPR H271  COMPARATIVE AND TRANSNATIONAL STUDIES: FROM KUALA LUMPUR TO KANSAS CITY  (1.0 Credit)

Thomas Donahue

Division: Social Science
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts); B: Analysis of the Social World

How do we make sense of a globalizing world and its workings? This course, which is the gateway to the proposed minor in Comparative & Transnational Studies is for students who are intrigued by that question. So we examine ideas, institutions, and processes in transnational perspective, looking at how important phenomena were shaped and re-shaped as they were passed around the globe and reinterpreted by various actors. We also consider various comparisons of phenomena across countries, cultures, and areas, taking note of how and when they show us similarities we had ignored, or differences we had missed.

(Offered: Spring 2021)

ICPR H277  ETHICAL LEADERSHIP IN BUSINESS AND THE PROFESSIONS  (1.0 Credit)

Neal Grabell

Division: Social Science
Domain(s): B: Analysis of the Social World

Through an exploration of ethical theory and case studies, we will examine topics such as: the tension between compliance with the law and the profit motive, professional responsibility and detachment, the proper treatment of clients/patients, short-term vs. long-term benefits, the relevance of social benefits claims to business practice, doing "well" by doing "good", and the dilemma of ethical relativism in the world of international business.

(Offered: Spring 2021)

ICPR H290  INTERDISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVES ON GENDER  (1.0 Credit)

Christophe Corbin

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts)

Explore the intersection of gender, sexuality, race, class, religion, and embodiment in our time. Our focus is principally on the USA, though we make some forays into international conversations. Readings are drawn from a smattering of the most recent developments in academic research and theory, as well as from science fiction, activism, popular culture, and new media. We work to bring the personal into the classroom, and to take what we learn out into the world.

(Offered: Fall 2020)

ICPR H295  QUAKERS, WAR, AND SLAVERY, 1646-1723  (1.0 Credit)

David Harrington Watt

Division: Humanities
Domain(s): A: Meaning, Interpretation (Texts); B: Analysis of the Social World

A seminar on Early Friends’ views on war and slavery. Students will analyze primary sources and secondary works to explore how and why Early Friends came to see both war and slavery as immoral. Crosslisted: Independent College Programs; Peace, Justice and Human Rights; Religion Prerequisite(s): First Year Writing

ICPR H298  IMPACT INVESTING  (1.0 Credit)

Shannon Mudd

Division: Social Science
Domain(s): B: Analysis of the Social World

Impact investing is investing to generate both a financial return and a positive social benefit. It supports firms seeking to address social, environmental and /or governance problems (ESG) in a sustainable way often within market activity. The focus of this course is to not only gain an understanding of the theory and practice of impact investing across its many components, but also to gain practical experience by assessing a particular set of potential impact investments, making formal presentations of findings to an investment committee leading to a recommendation for investment to a partnering foundation. Crosslisted: Economics, Independent College Programs, PJHR Prerequisite(s): ECON 104 or 105 or 106

ICPR H301  DEVELOPMENT, HUMAN RIGHTS, AND TRANSNATIONAL INJUSTICES  (1.0 Credit)

Thomas Donahue

Division: Social Justice; Social Science
Domain(s): B: Analysis of the Social World

What are the worldwide obstacles to peace and justice? How can we surmount them? This course examines theories of some of the leading obstacles to peace and justice worldwide, and of what global citizens can do about them. The three obstacles we consider are colonialism and its legacies, whether we live in a global racial order, and whether the global economic order harms the poor and does them a kind of violence. The two solutions we will consider are the project of economic and social development, and the practice of human rights. The course aims, first, to give students some of the knowledge they will need to address these problems and be effective global citizens. Second, to understand some of the major forces that shape the present world order. Third and finally, to hone the skills in analysis, theory-building, and arguing that are highly valued in legal and political advocacy, in public life and the professions, and in graduate school. Crosslisted: Independent College Programs, Political Science

(Offered: Fall 2020, Spring 2021)

ICPR H319  HUMAN RIGHTS IN PHILADELPHIA AND PENNSYLVANIA–IN NATIONAL AND GLOBAL CONTEXT  (1.0 Credit)

Eric Hartman

Division: Social Science
Domain(s): B: Analysis of the Social World

This course considers human rights as moral aspirations and as interdependent experiences created through civil law, drawing on student internships with social sector organizations in Philadelphia and throughout the United States, to interrogate the relationship between social issues and policy structures. Prerequisite(s): An internship through the Center for Peace and Global Citizenship. Exceptions may be made for students involved in other forms of sustained community engagement and/or activism.